j


1.Meeting KOPPA /
The story of the Traveling KOPPA

 

"KOPPA" means “pieces of woods” or “scrap wood” in Japanese, which was taken as a name of the designed furniture series and the team in this story. KOPPA started out as a challenge: Tamotsu Ito, an architect from Japan, wanted to utilize leftover building materials that would otherwise have been thrown away.

The meeting between KOPPA and Wacom was pure happenstance. In July 2019, Nobu Ide, Wacom’s president & CEO and Rita Chen, Wacom’s technical marketing manager, visited the new office of mui Lab, Inc. in Kyoto which was designed by Tamotsu. He created a design concept that was based on the historical planning and module of the Kyoto Machiya building types, a feature that fascinated them.


Nobu:

After we met Tamotsu at the mui office, we visited an exhibition (*) that he was part of.
*"Under 35 Young Architects Exhibition"

Rita:
I noticed a bookshelf placed inconspicuously in the corner among the works of the various architects exhibited.

Nobu:
I wasn’t even sure if the shelf was one of his designed pieces to be honest at first glance, but I thought that either way, it would be great for our next exhibition after we read its caption. Our exhibitions not only display our technologies, but also the stories behind them. I was intrigued and felt that their concept would fit perfectly with ours. Since we didn't have much time until our next exhibition, I asked if we could buy the shelf on the spot.


Tamotsu, Moe (planner), and Shokichi (carpenter) were all at the venue. It was KOPPA’s first exhibition – and also the beginning of much more to come. The result was that "Traveling KOPPA" – a new type of display furniture developed from the original KOPPA concept – was created.


Nobu:

It was impressive when I met Shokichi. When I asked if we could buy it, his answer was "I’m a carpenter!". I talked to Tamotsu and his first word was "Yes!". He was already one step ahead and kindly added that he can even optimize it for Wacom.

Rita:
I had wanted to buy KOPPA as it was. But when I heard him say that, I asked him a lot of questions to see if it would fit our exhibition concept. We talked about using more depth and making it lighter to carry around in a suitcase.

Tamotsu:
The biggest challenge was the weight. It was also difficult to make the size fit in a suitcase. The timeline was also really tight. But I knew we could do it because we were motivated by how much we would enjoy a new creative challenge, rather than doing it purely for business reasons. The whole project really depended on whether we could interpret limits and conditions in a positive way and just have fun with it. I had a feeling that the Traveling KOPPA gave us interesting conditions, such as Wacom’s short delivery and mobility requirements for the exhibition.

Moe:
I was happy to know that Wacom was able to get on board with our interpretation of fun. We were just talking about how great it would be to continue working together on a small scale after the exhibition. That’s when we realized that we were already taking the next step.

Shokichi:
The initial idea behind KOPPA was to have fun, while eliminating construction wastes and our mixed feelings towards them. The simple fact is that we converted scrap wood into a product. But the more exciting part is that we – an architect, real estate agent, carpenter and bartender – were able to bring it all together. And that we developed a new project together with Wacom, a company that we never dreamed we’d be working with!

s   s

Continue to: 2. No need to destroy it anymore / The story of the Traveling KOPPA

 

 

Team KOPPA Profile

s   s   s

Tamotsu Ito

Architect/Principal of "tamotsu ito architecture office". He started KOPPA with the aim to work seamlessly across various dimensions and scales, such as urban projects, architecture, furniture, and interior design.

 

Moe Donaka

She’s the KOPPA team’s organizational lead and belongs to the "Arts & Crafts" design office.

 

Shota Nozaki

Carpenter/Artist. From interior design to art events, he has a knack for creating. Shota is also a representative of the architectural group "noma”.


  s   s  
 

Kazuaki Uemura

The owner of the bar “inspire” is a carpenter by day, and bartender by night.

 

Syu Ohki

Representative of the Institute of Life Engineering Design and is both a researcher of livelihood and a carpenter.

 

Explore projects

d

“Stage KOPPA”, a stage that connects stories

"Stage KOPPA" was created as a stage for Connected Ink 2020. It is a stage that changes its shape and role in response to different situations while connecting the various stories that occur there.

Read More ::before ::after

d

Keep asking questions and moving forward / Connected Ink

Connected Ink 2020 was the beginning of a new commitment and challenge for Wacom to continue asking those eternal questions that always play in our minds.

Read More ::before ::after

d

Our Sparks.
“Mam and Dad’s Child Interest” by Stella Wang

Our sparks meet constantly changing situations, unexpected challenges, and new opportunities. We called on our team members again to show how they see their spark in the world of today and the future.

Read More ::before ::after

d

Our Sparks.
"A moment on an autumn mountain" by Takahiro Yamamoto

We had an internal art contest for our Social Initiatives. Let us share the existence of the spark in our team members’ hearts with their artworks.

Read More ::before ::after

d

Online drawing class for elementary school students during stay-at-home period

Yoshinori Mita, a team member of Japan held an online drawing class together with FC KAZO and illustrator Suiiro to provide something fun for elementary school children to do during the COVID-19 stay-at-home period.

Read More ::before ::after

d

Wacom's new initiative through soccer

As an official partner, Wacom supports FC KAZO, a soccer club in Kazo City, Saitama Prefecture, Japan. We’re excited to introduce our new initiatives with this inspiring club.

Read More ::before ::after

d

Our Sparks.
"The spark is in you! Mirror portraits during times of isolation" by Oliver Madlener

We had an internal art contest for our Social Initiatives. Let us share the existence of the spark in our team members’ hearts with their artworks.

Read More ::before ::after

d

Online Sketchnoting workshop for children during school closures

Our team members in Germany organized an online workshop “Young Wacom” for the children while schools were closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read More ::before ::after

d

3. How KOPPA began /
The story of the Traveling KOPPA

KOPPA began in April 2019. Tamotsu wanted to make something that can be used again after an exhibition. We asked Team KOPPA about their thoughts.

Read More ::before ::after

d

2. No need to destroy it anymore /
The story of the Traveling KOPPA

We put it together ourselves, set it up, put it back, then travel together again. The Traveling KOPPA, our new display furniture came to be.

Read More ::before ::after

d

1.Meeting KOPPA /
The story of the Traveling KOPPA

KOPPA started out as a challenge: Tamotsu Ito, an architect from Japan, wanted to utilize leftover building materials. Our meeting was pure happenstance.

Read More ::before ::after

d

Support the "lives" of artists through customer support

Alex Duffey from our Americas Support team established a new program to support artists. We asked him about a story with Ms. Devon Bragg, the artist who inspired him to establish this program.

Read More ::before ::after

d

Our Sparks.
“That Spark Inside” by Simone Wolters

We had an internal art contest for our Social Initiatives. Let us share the existence of the spark in our team members’ hearts with their artworks.

Read More ::before ::after

d

Marketing lecture for future engineers

We gave a marketing lecture for students who are learning to be engineers at the National Institute of Technology Tokyo College.

Read More ::before ::after

d

Efforts by our sales member, who are responsible for a pen tablet until the very end

Every year, we take pen tablets that have been sitting in our warehouse and gift them to high school clubs and winners of high school art competitions to help students create digital contents.

Read More ::before ::after

s

For the Future of Education
Lifelong Ink x AI

"AI Ink for Education" was developed to capture eye movement information and pen movements while learning, in order to ascertain the characteristics of learning by each student and to create an educational environment suited to each student.

Read More ::before ::after

d

Wacom Intuos have been introduced in a school to make classes more fun and creative

Yoana Simeonova, a software designer working in Bulgaria, introduced Wacom Intuos in a school to make children's IT classes more fun.

Read More ::before ::after

d

Publication of the children’s book “Feminism is for Boys”

Elizabeth Rhodes, a UX designer in the U.S., created and published the children's book "Feminism is for Boys" in order to show gender equality.

Read More ::before ::after

The Company's basic compliance policy, such as codes, policies, and systems related to sustainability

Read More ::before ::after

Back to top
A+ A-
Support